A bit of positivity

  I’m sitting in a comfy armchair, iPad on my knee, drink in my hand, relaxing.

Life is good.

I have a job, one which keeps the roof above my head. One I’m fairly good at. One I’ll be doing in a different department from next month in an exciting opportunity.

Life is good.

I have a gorgeous, fantastic wife who keeps me sane and stops me being a complete idiot all of the time. I have three fantastic children who I am incredibly proud of. I have an extended family whom I love.

Life is good.

I live in a nice house, in a nice area in one of the most comfortable countries in the world to live. I have food on the table, a roof above my head and a bed to sleep in.

Life is good.

I am certain in my faith in God. I have made some great friends doing all sorts of things from amateur dramatics to being a member of a political party. I stand up for what I believe in and am starting to feel that I can make a difference.

Life is good.

I suffer from migraines, but control them with regular medication. I have depression, but more pills pretty much keep that at bay. I nearly died 12 years ago, but I came out the other end. To all intents and purposes, I have my health.

Life is good.

I still moan and grumble. I still stress out about things. I still get annoyed, upset and irritated. But I can look at all the things I’ve written above and be thankful. Life doesn’t always go as I want it, but it’s still very, very good.

That’s not the way for everybody. I look at the refugees crossing the Mediterranean, many paying all the money they have to men willing to exploit their desire to make a life for themselves away from fear, terror and poverty. I look at the people of Nepal, devastated by the recent earthquake. I look at people in this country relying on foodbanks, seeing their welfare payment sanctioned for tiny things, struggling with loneliness, living on the streets. I look at all of these and more and I realise more than ever that my life is good and I am lucky, or blessed or whatever you want to call it.

And I realise that I need to use that luck, that blessing. I need to use it to be a voice for those who have none. I need to fight for those who aren’t in my position. I’m not rich, powerful, influential or “important”, but in this world I am still privileged. I need to use that privilege, that small voice I have, to say what I think is right and just.

That is one reason I want to be a reader in the Church of Scotland; to bring the message of justice, mercy, acceptance and freedom that Jesus preached, lived, died and rose again for. That is a reason I have joined a political party, to come together with like minded people to join our small voices together to make one loud one.

We won’t all do these things, but many people will look at what I have said about my life and see themselves there. And for those people I say congratulations! Life is good!

Now, do something with it.